‘My Run’ Movie Review

Here’s an interesting and little-known fact about me: I don’t really like movies. I find them boring, predictable, and too theatrical for my tastes. Sure, I have a few select favorites that kept me on the edge of my seat and also made me use my brain (okay, the only thing I can think of in recent history is Inception). I don’t like comedies and I don’t like romance. I know, I’m weird, but I would rather read a book and use my own imagination to create the picture. Then again, I own like 92 copies of Wuthering Heights because it is my favorite book and no one gets that except my husband who is creepily reminded of Mark David Chapman.
All that aside, I must admit, I went to see My Run with high hopes – something that is completely out of character for me. I couldn’t wait to see it. In fact, after premiering on a Thursday night, the film would serve as motivation for my first 18 mile run on Saturday – no matter how good (or bad) it was.
My Run is the story of 57-year-old Terry Hitchcock who, after losing his wife to breast cancer, was left to raise three small children on his own. Not long after his wife’s passing, Terry also lost his job and soon found out how difficult raising a family alone could be. He decided, against all odds, to raise awareness for single-parent households and the struggles that are faced each and every day, by running 75 consecutive marathons in 75 days on an over 2,000 mile cross country trek.
The film is simplistic in nature and is primarily an interview of Terry, his three children, and his road team intermixed with footage from the road, newspaper clippings, and original music. This format is perfect for this film because it allows Terry to tell his own story. As he recounts the days spent living out of a trailer – and eventually the front seat of a car – Terry proves that “human beings can accomplish anything they put their minds to.  All they need to get started is someone to show them it’s possible.” We get all caught up in the latest running fashions, shoes, nutrition, and technology – Terry just ran. He ran through rain, blazing heat, cold, uphill, downhill, on the freeways and back country roads. He even ran with chest pains and stress fractures in his ankles and knee.
Even after his young team returned to their home in St. Paul, Minnesota (They said it was too hard and Terry was too cranky) and Terry was left with only his oldest son, he kept running – each day, every day – strengthening an unbreakable bond between father and son— not stopping until he broke the finish line tape in Atlanta, Georgia. His son crossed the line with him.
Terry, in fact, doesn’t even describe himself as a runner. He trained for 17 months prior to his odyssey. His trainer, Scott Meier, knowing there was no way to prepare Terry (who had never run in his life) for such a journey, focused on teaching Terry how to never give up and how to “climb the highest mountain.” Terry ran 2 or 3 miles every day and Scott taught Terry to push beyond his physical abilities in preparation to complete the run. Halfway through the training, Terry had a heart attack. His cardiologist said it was impossible for him to run. He shouldn’t even consider running to Atlanta. Terry had his mind set on the goal, though, and he recovered and continued with his training. Terry never told Scott he had the heart attack until just a few years ago!  
I have had a few people ask me what I thought of the film and my verdict is? I loved it. Every second of it. I found it motivational, inspirational, and amazing. Terry reminds us of the obstacles we face every day – the marathons of life – and that we can overcome them with determination, self-confidence, belief in the extraordinary, and the will to succeed. I have also had people tell me that they thought the Terry Fox story or Sprit of the Marathon were better stories, but I find this discouraging. The fact that anyone stands up for what they believe in and goes to such extreme measures, overcoming all odds, to do so, is not for me to judge. I admire all of these people for what they have done and the odds they have overcome to solidify their belief – it is all amazing to me. In Terry’s situation, I can’t imagine losing the love of my life, raising children without that someone (which I don’t even have), and running in pain and alone across the country – that is remarkable. I know his team supported him throughout and were cheering him on, but even they packed it up and headed home when the going got tough, but not Terry. He set his mind to accomplish a goal and he prevailed – like many others, no doubt – but his story is unique just like the others because it is his.   
I am awed by the passion, determination, perseverance and sheer mental toughness of Terry Hitchcock – in fact, it helped get me through 18 miles Saturday. 75 marathons in 75 days?! I don’t have a right to complain about one mile in Pittsburgh! Congratulations to Mr. Mark Castaldo and his team on a wonderful film and thank you for sharing Terry’s story with all of us! And, once again, thank you for including my name in the film credits as a “My Runner.” How cool is that!? Terry is sure to be an inspiration to me for a long time to come!
Until the next mile marker,

Comments

  1. 92 copies? I’m impressed! I love that book too, but I also like movies. I’ll look forward to seeing this one!

  2. Anonymous says:

    Wonderful review, you retold his story in a beautiful way. Thank you for sharing this movie with all of us.

    ~ Darlene

  3. And I used my free movie tickets I won to take my husband with me to see it. I thought it was a great story as well and am so glad I went to see it! Thank you for doing the giveaway!

  4. And I used my free movie tickets I won to take my husband with me to see it. I thought it was a great story as well and am so glad I went to see it! Thank you for doing the giveaway!

  5. Anonymous says:

    Wonderful review, you retold his story in a beautiful way. Thank you for sharing this movie with all of us.

    ~ Darlene

  6. 92 copies? I’m impressed! I love that book too, but I also like movies. I’ll look forward to seeing this one!

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